Bridges!

Two weeks ago we arrived at our destination near the small town of Keene, in southwest New Hampshire, where we will be until the end of June. The days started out pretty cold, then came several rainy days until now when the last few days have been just perfect. We love spending our time with our family here and have done some exploring on our own.

The local Farmers Market is in downtown Keene on Saturdays and Tuesdays. Here you can buy locally grown fresh produce, bottles of maple syrup, fresh home-made cheeses, baked goods, and crafts.

IMG_3987

Farmers Market in Keene, NH

Since it was such a beautiful day we went for a drive to find some of the cool bridges in the area. The first one we found was a 100-year-old Cheshire Railroad Stone Arch Bridge. I could not find a safe place to park the car and walk for a good picture so had to shoot this from the car as we drove by.

IMG_3999

Cheshire Railroad Stone Arch Bridge

There are several covered bridges near us. The West Dummerston Covered Bridge, in Dummerston VT, not far from Brattleboro VT, across the border from Keene NH, at 280 feet, is the longest covered bridge entirely within the state of Vermont.

IMG_3944

West Dummerston Covered Bridge, 1872

IMG_4008

1789 Carlton Bridge, New 1869

IMG_4026

Sawyers Crossing Covered Bridge, also known as Cresson Bridge, 1859

The Ashuelot Rail Trail crosses near the Cresson Bridge so we walked that for a while and found this neat old railroad bridge along the way.

IMG_4031

Ashuelot Rail Trail

We have the pleasure of crossing the Thompson Bridge every time we leave or return to Ashuelot River Campground, where we are staying. It’s like stepping back in time every time we go somewhere.

IMG_4050

West Swanzey Bridge, also known as Thompson Bridge 1832

And then there is a cool bridge at Ashuelot River Park in downtown Keene, NH.

IMG_3972

Ashuelot River Park

This entry was posted in Daily Post, May, New Hampshire and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Bridges!

  1. I love the covered bridges!

    Like

I would love to hear from you, please comment..

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s